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De-Stress in Minutes: A Beginner's Guide to EFT Tapping



Tapping

Have you ever heard of "tapping" for stress relief? It might sound unusual, but this technique, called EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique), has been gaining popularity for its simplicity and effectiveness.

For me, the journey with EFT began during my health coaching certification. That initial spark has grown into a passion, and I'm now pursuing a deeper understanding of this powerful tool.


What is EFT (Tapping)?

EFT (tapping) is exactly what it sounds like. You gently tap on specific points on your body to bring relief from physical or emotional discomfort. The idea is that these points lie on meridians, which are believed to be energy channels in the body. By tapping on them, you can influence this energy flow and promote overall well-being.

The beauty of EFT? You can tap for practically anything – from headaches to anxiety.


Getting Started with EFT Tapping for Stress


Here's a simple EFT routine you can try for stress relief:

  1. Rate your stress. On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), how stressed are you feeling right now?

  2. Set-up statement. Acknowledge your stress while accepting yourself completely. Here's an example: "Even though I am feeling stressed right now, I deeply and completely accept myself."

  3. Begin tapping.

Here are the tapping points, along with affirmations you can repeat as you tap (around 5-7 taps per point):

  • Karate Chop Point: The fleshy part of your hand, on the outside, between your pinky finger and wrist.

  • Eyebrow Point: Inner part of your eyebrow.

  • Side of the Eye: Crow's feet area, on the bone beside your eye.

  • Under the Eye: Below your eye, aligned with the center of your pupil.

  • Nose Point: The space between your nose and upper lip.

  • Chin Point: The indentation between your lower lip and chin.

  • Collarbone Point: The hollow notch just below your collarbone.

  • Underarm Point: About 4 finger-widths below your armpit.

  • Crown of the Head: The very top of your head.

  1. Re-evaluate. After tapping through all the points, take a deep breath and assess your stress level again. Did your initial rating decrease?

  2. Repeat (optional).  If needed, continue tapping through the points, focusing on a new intensity level in your set-up statement. Aim to bring your stress level down to 0 or 1.


Want to see it in action?

For a visual guide, check out the video linked at the end of this post.


Here's to de-stressing!




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